Why am I always so impatient?

This article is about impatience and how you can find your way out of impatience into relaxation with new patience. Some people consider chronic impatience to be a character flaw or even a mental disorder. The question of impatience preoccupies many people. That’s why it’s important to provide answers here.

Why am I always so impatient?

When I want to deal with a task, I lose my patience after a short time. I always have the feeling that another task could be even more important. Then I drop the first task and turn to the next one. And so on. My constant impatience leads to a lot of stress.

Why don’t I have the patience to finish one thing?

Is this impatience still normal?

There are several hypotheses for why a person often feels impatient.

For example, you might be naturally full of drive.

  • You are used to a fast pace of work and feel that you always need to keep moving to be productive.
  • People who always define themselves only in terms of performance live in constant stress. It would be interesting if you investigate whether you have to achieve something first in order to be respected and appreciated.
  • It could also be that you have difficulty concentrating on a task. This, in turn, may have to do with the fear that one day there will not be enough time to accomplish all the tasks.

Under these circumstances, it’s logical that you may feel like you have to constantly switch back and forth between different tasks in order to get everything done.

Break. Give yourself a break.

Take a look at the free reading sample of “Mind Rooms”

It might give you a different thought. It is the thought that you can increase your concentration with a simple concept.

As soon as you are concentrated, impatience also decreases

In life, it is important to learn to wait. Pretend that you have already received what you had been hoping for all day, full of impatience.

Set up an inner image in your imagination that shows your plan already in completion or you at the goal of your path today. This works wonderfully with the imagined “Mind Rooms” system.

In this way you can create the feeling of letting things come to you without pressure. And this happens faster than most people think possible.

Johannes Faupel: Author

Johannes Faupel: Author “Mind Rooms”

Author

Johannes Faupel – Frankfurt am Main, Germany